The official site of the City of West Jordan, Utah 8000 S. Redwood Rd., West Jordan, Utah 84088 - (801) 569-5000  
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  Frequently Asked Questions

Question: Can I have a fire in my backyard?

Answer:
An open pit cooking fire is allowed as long as it is located 25' from any building, fence, deck or anything that will burn. A source of water should be at hand to put out the fire, and the fire should not be left unattended. It is unlawful to burn leaves, tree limbs, or rubbish in your cooking pit. You are also responsible for the smoke produced by the fire. Please be considerate of your neighbors.

Question: Can I ride along with the fire department?
Answer:
While we appreciate the public interest in the work we do, we do not allow the general Public to ride along. Because of issues related to limited space, patient confidentiality and potential exposure to biological hazards, riders are limited to EMT and Paramedic students through prearranged programs.

News
NFPA Report: cooking is #1 cause of home fires
Cooking was involved in 146,400 home structure fires in the U.S. in 2005. These fires caused 480 deaths, 4,690 injuries, and $876 million in direct property damage.

NFPA offers the following safety tips.

  • Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.
  • If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you’re cooking.
  • To prevent cooking fires, you have to be alert. You won’t be if you are sleepy, have been drinking alcohol, or have taken medicine that makes you drowsy.
  • Keep anything that can catch fire – potholders, oven mitts, wooden utensils, paper or plastic bags, boxes, food packaging, towels or curtains – away from your stovetop.
  • Keep the stovetop, burners and oven clean.
  • Keep pets off cooking surfaces and nearby countertops to prevent them from knocking things onto the burner.
  • Wear short, close fitting or tightly rolled sleeves when cooking. Loose clothing can dangle onto stove burners and can catch fire if it comes in contact with a gas flame or electric burner.

Read the full story at:
http://www.nfpa.org/newsReleaseDetails.asp?categoryID=488&itemID=38266

No mouth-to-mouth required in new CPR rules
You can skip the mouth-to-mouth breathing and just press on the chest to save a life.

In a major change, the American Heart Association said that hands-only CPR — rapid, deep presses on the victim’s chest until help arrives — works just as well as standard CPR for sudden cardiac arrest in adults.

Experts hope bystanders will now be more willing to jump in and help if they see someone suddenly collapse. Hands-only CPR is simpler and easier to remember and removes a big barrier for people skittish about the mouth-to-mouth breathing.

Hands-only CPR calls for uninterrupted chest presses — 100 a minute — until paramedics take over or an automated external defibrillator is available to restore a normal heart rhythm.

This action should be taken only for adults who unexpectedly collapse, stop breathing and are unresponsive. The odds are that the person is having cardiac arrest — the heart suddenly stops — which can occur after a heart attack or be caused by other heart problems. In such a case, the victim still has ample air in the lungs and blood and compressions keep blood flowing to the brain, heart and other organs.

A child who collapses is more likely to primarily have breathing problems — and in that case, mouth-to-mouth breathing should be used. That also applies to adults who suffer lack of oxygen from a near-drowning, drug overdose, or carbon monoxide poisoning. In these cases, people need mouth-to-mouth to get air into their lungs and bloodstream.

March 31, 2008
Read the full story at:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23884566

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